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Anyone read Joe Nocera’s column today in the NYT?Unknown-1

Here is how it begins.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/29/opinion/joe-nocera-teaching-teaching.html?module=Search&mabReward=relbias%3Ar%2C%7B%221%22%3A%22RI%3A8%22%7D&_r=0

“I’m starting to wonder if we’ve entered some kind of golden age of books about education. First came Paul Tough’s book, ‘How Children Succeed,’ about the importance of developing non-cognitive skills in students. It was published in September 2012. Then came ‘The Smartest Kids in the World,’ by Amanda Ripley, which tackled the question of what other countries were getting right in the class room that America was getting wrong. Her book came out just about a year ago.”


And now comes Elizabeth Green’s ‘Building a Better Teacher: How Teaching Works (and How to Teach It to Everyone)’, which will be published next week, and which was excerpted in The New York Times Magazine over the weekend. The first two books made the New York Times best-seller list. My guess is that Green’s book will, too. It certainly ought to.”


What the? So the only books written since 2012  worth reading about education are by Paul Tough, Amanda Ripley, and now Elizabeth Green? All journalists? Not Diane Ravitch?


Are teachers like Laurel Sturt (Davonte’s Inferno), Kris Neilson (Children of the Core), Janet Mayer (As Bad As They Say?) , Mercedes Schneider (A Chronicle of Echoes)and me  (Doing The Right Thing: A Teacher Speaks), for example, chopped liver? 


In his world the only worthy authors who write about how to educate kids or teach teachers aren’t teachers?


Really? Maybe we should write books about how to be a better journalist, or columnist for the NYT?

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